Scania introduces new side detection system

Swedish truck manufacturer Scania has introduced two new side detection systems designed to avoid or mitigate scenarios where the truck may come into contact with other road users.

The systems are Blind Spot Warning (BSW), which is on both sides of the truck and Vulnerable Road User Collision Warning (VRUCW), on passenger side.

The systems – which use radar, radar sensors and cameras in combination – work at speeds over 2 km/h, including on motorways, although they are primarily intended for urban environments up to 36 km/h. BSW and VRUCW provide audible and visual warnings to the driver, escalated in three levels.

Scania anticipate that pedestrians and cyclists are among those who will benefit the most from the extra “eyes” that Scania gives its trucks with these systems.   

In the UK, the most common incident is when a truck turns left at a junction while a cyclist tries to pass the truck on the left side. With side detection functionality, if a cyclist or a pedestrian enters a risk zone near the truck, the system will alert the truck driver by visual and audible warnings in the cab.

While the BSW system is mainly designed to warn truck drivers of “hidden” cars when at higher speeds switching lanes, it can also warn for bikes and pedestrians. And while the main focus of VRUCW is detecting cyclists and motorbikes, it can also spot pedestrians.

“The enhanced Side Detection is yet another component in Scania’s aim to increase the safety of vulnerable road-users”, said Alexander Vlaskamp, senior vice president, head of Scania Trucks. “I strongly feel that every truck driver would like to have this relentless support system on their side when dealing with busy traffic environments.

“Trucks form the backbone of urban society – ensuring we all do all we can to promote safety is crucial for everyone. Scania believes ADAS systems can make a real difference, assisting drivers to handle some of the most challenging driving environments safely.”

Dan Parton
Dan Parton is a former editor of Truck & Driver, the UK’s biggest selling truck magazine. He is now writes for The Van Expert and The Truck Expert.

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